putrida:

Amelia Bauerle.

putrida:

Amelia Bauerle.

Source: necroluste

cumberdoom:

papermonocle:

Things I learnt today: During WW1, MI5 used Girl Guides to send secret messages. They used Girl Guides because they quickly found that Boy Scouts couldn’t be trusted and were’t efficient enough.

At the start of the war Boy Scouts were also used. But it quickly became clear that Girl Guides were more efficient because they were less boisterous and talkative.

the boy scouts were too gossipy, so they used girl guides as spies instead this is probably the best day of my life

Source: papermonocle

Source: onlytwitterpics

briandanielwolf:

vixyish:

xixsem:

I DID THIS IM VERY PROUD OF IT YOU KNOW WHY
BECAUSE
WAIT FOR IT
LORDE OF THE RINGS

But every day’s like
Gold ring, greybeard, trippin’ on the mushrooms
Blood-mad Nazgul trashin’ the hotel room
We don’t care
We got to Rivendell across the stream

And everybody’s like
Mountains, dwarf mines, presents from the Elf Queen
Rowboats, rock paths, Gollum on a rope leash
We don’t care
Yeah we’re simply gonna walk in there

Cuz we’re going to Moooooordor
(Moooooordor)

briandanielwolf:

vixyish:

xixsem:

I DID THIS IM VERY PROUD OF IT YOU KNOW WHY

BECAUSE

WAIT FOR IT

LORDE OF THE RINGS

But every day’s like
Gold ring, greybeard, trippin’ on the mushrooms
Blood-mad Nazgul trashin’ the hotel room
We don’t care
We got to Rivendell across the stream
And everybody’s like
Mountains, dwarf mines, presents from the Elf Queen
Rowboats, rock paths, Gollum on a rope leash
We don’t care
Yeah we’re simply gonna walk in there

Cuz we’re going to Moooooordor

(Moooooordor)

Source: xixsem

cutfromadiffcloth:

Brand: Duro Olowu

Designer: Duro Olowu

Spring 2015 RTW Collection

cutfromadiffcloth.tumblr.com

Source: cutfromadiffcloth

25 things i wish i realized while i was still in highschool

-

  1. That zit on your cheek literally does not matter
  2. Skipping class one time will not ruin your entire life
  3. The boy you’re trying so hard to impress will mean nothing to you in a year
  4. Bring coffee to school and ignore people who make fun of it
  5. Bring a snack, too. Don’t care if people hear you eating in class.
  6. Being popular isn’t and will never be something that seriously defines who you are
  7. Appreciate your teachers
  8. Doing/not doing drugs doesn’t make you cooler than anyone else.
  9. Neither does drinking
  10. Talk to the kid sitting alone; even though it may not change your life it could drastically change theirs
  11. Participate in school events
  12. Wear sweatpants everyday
  13. Or wear a dress everyday
  14. Wear whatever makes you comfortable
  15. Nobody will laugh at you if you sit alone at your lunch table for five minutes
  16. Utilize the library
  17. Don’t wait 20 minutes to text someone back just to seem cool
  18. Tell your friends how much you love them
  19. Cherish your free textbooks… seriously
  20. Help confused freshmen, be nice to them. Remember how much you would have appreciated it a couple years ago
  21. Compliment the other girls in the bathroom
  22. That fight you had with your mom really isn’t that big of a deal
  23. It’s okay to cry
  24. Don’t let your desire for a romantic relationship stop you from forming platonic relationships
  25. Remember that life does go on

(via tomlinbooties)

Source: tomlinbooties

My Least Favorite Trope (and this post will include spoilers for The Lego Movie, Guardians of the Galaxy, The Matrix, Western Civilization, and—cod help me—Bulletproof Monk*.) is the thing where there’s an awesome, smart, wonderful, powerful female character who by all rights ought to be the Chosen One and the hero of the movie, who is tasked with taking care of some generally ineffectual male character who is, for reasons of wish fulfillment, actually the person the film focuses on. She mentors him, she teaches him, and she inevitably becomes his girlfriend… and he gets the job she wanted: he gets to be the Chosen One even though she’s obviously far more qualified. And all he has to do to get it and deserve it is Man Up and Take Responsibility.

And that’s it. Every god-damned time. The mere fact of naming the films above and naming the trope gives away the entire plot and character arc of every single movie.

- Elizabeth Bear - My Least Favorite Trope (via feministquotes)

Source: feministquotes

Children should remain silent, and they are ‘good’ when they’re quiet, but ‘bad’ when they are not, because they are disturbing the adults and causing trouble. This attitude runs through the way people interact with children on every level, and yet, they seem surprised when it turns out that children have been struggling with serious medical problems, or they’ve been assaulted or abused.

The most common response is ‘well why didn’t the child say something?’ or ‘why didn’t the child talk to an adult?’ Adults constantly assure themselves that children know to go to a grownup when they are in trouble, and they even repeat that sentiment to children; you can always come to us, adults tell children, when you need help. Find a trusted adult, a teacher or a doctor or a police officer or a firefighter, and tell that adult what’s going on, and you’ll be helped, and everything will be all right.

The thing is that children do that, and the adults don’t listen. Every time a child tells an adult about something and nothing happens, that child learns that adults are liars, and that they don’t provide the promised help. Children hold up their end of the deal by reporting, sometimes at great personal risk, and they get no concrete action in return. Sometimes, the very adult people tell a child to ‘trust’ is the least reliable person; the teacher is friends with the priest who is molesting a student, the firefighter plays pool with the father who is beating a child, they don’t want to cause a scene.

Or children are accused of lying for attention because they accused the wrong person. They’re told they must be mistaken about what happened, unclear on the specifics, because there’s no way what they’re saying could be true, so and so isn’t that kind of person. A mother would never do that. He’s a respected member of the community! In their haste to close their ears to the child’s voice, adults make sure the child’s experience is utterly denied and debunked. Couldn’t be, can’t be, won’t be. The child knows not to say such things in the future, because no one is listening, because people will actively tell the child to be quiet.

Children are also told that they aren’t experiencing what they’re actually experiencing, or they’re being fussy about nothing. A child reports a pain in her leg after gym class, and she’s told to quit whining. Four months later, everyone is shocked when her metastatic bone cancer becomes unavoidably apparent. Had someone listened to her in the first place when she reported the original bone pain and said it felt different that usual, she would have been evaluated sooner. A child tells a teacher he has trouble seeing the blackboard, and the teacher dismisses it, so the child is never referred for glasses; the child struggles with math until high school, when someone finally acknowledges there’s a problem.

This attitude, that children shouldn’t be believed, puts the burden of proof on children, rather than assuming that there might be something to their statements. Some people seem to think that actually listening to children would result in a generation of hopelessly spoiled brats who know they can say anything for attention, but would that actually be the case? That assumption is rooted in the idea that children are not trustworthy, and cannot be respected. I’m having trouble understanding why adults should be viewed as inherently trustworthy and respectable, especially in light of the way we treat children.

-

Children Talk But No One Listens – this ain’t livin’ (via unsungtale)

This. 1000 x this.

(via jainsilver)

This never changed in my house.  So, you know, that was fun.

(via dorkilybeautiful)

This. One of the central events of my life involved trying to tell adults that a terrible thing was happening. Instead of receiving help, I was told I was the problem, I was making too much noise about it. I’ve never forgotten the rage, the fear, the sense of helplessness.

(via ladyofthelog)

Source: meloukhia.net

Codependency isn’t sexy. It isn’t romantic. It’s built with a fuse and will surely burn out. The healthiest thing you can say to the one you love is, “I would be okay without you, and that’s why I choose to stay.”

- LB, A Few Things About Love (via yesdarlingido)

Source: yesdarlingido

kissikissi:

After working on my previous Thumbelina image, I felt like I really wanted to carry on that little bit longer with this theme of teeny, tiny people. And so very recently I started working on this new illustration, loosely based on The Borrowers by Mary Norton and here is the result :)


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